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The invisible people – Italy's second generation immigrants

On February 28th hundreds of second-generation immigrants took the streets of Rome urging the government to approve the bill on citizenship for foreigners living in Italy. Takoua, a 25 years-old tunisian artist has been raised in Italy and is one of the hundreds protesting in central Rome claiming her right to be an italian citizen. At the moment, more than one million people born or raised in Italy are denied their right to vote and access the basic citizenships rights.

02:23
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Video information
Produced by virginia vitalone, malou visco comandini
Directed by federico fornaro
Video Language en
Produced Mar 01, 2017
Published Mar 01, 2017
Production Company Raw-News
Distributor Raw-News

Full Description

Character

Takoua Ben Mohamed, 25-years-old, has lived in Italy since she was 8-years-old. Originally from Tunisia and daughter to a political exile, she considers herself Italian. Italy, on the other hand, has still not granted her citizenship due to numerous bureaucratic hustles she has not been able to overcome. A cartoonist and a journalist, she cannot access the basic rights for citizens: apply to Italian-only scholarships to start a master degree, travel to neighboring European countries without a visa nor vote. In her cartoons, Takoua portrays Muslim veiled women’s daily routine and struggles. By doing so, she wants to build bridges between the Muslims community and Italians.


Background

Civil rights associations, parliament representatives and hundreds of second-generation immigrants have been urging the Italian government to approve the bill on citizenship for foreigners living in Italy. The law, already approved by the lower house, has been stalling at the Senate for more than one year due to the opposition of the far-right parties.  According to the bill, a person can be granted citizenship if: born in the country by a parent with residence permit; has arrived before the age of 12 and has studied in the country for more than 5 years or a foreigner that arrived before the age of 16 and has legally resided there and studied for more than 6 years.

Campaigners and foreigners ask for the "ius soli" (right of the soil or birthright citizenship) to be applied in Italy as in most western countries. As of now, the second-generation immigrants can ask for Italian citizenship only after turning 18-years-old and even then, they still need to have one parent who obtained citizenship and provide a bank statement. By approving the Ius soli, more than one million people would become Italian.

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